please add your comments to the US NRC re hormesis – the idea that low-level radiation is “good for you”

thank you to our reader who wrote the following:

THIS IS IMPORTANT – ACTION NEEDED:

Are you aware that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is considering a rule change that would adopt HORMESIS as the radiation-exposure-model instead of the present “Linear No-Threshold” radiation model?

HORMESIS is the idea that low-level radiation is “good for you.”

The NRC is also considering other recommendations that would allow citizens to be exposed to as much radiation as a nuclear worker; and to allow children and pregnant woman to be exposed to that amount of radiation, too. (it is well known that children and fetuses/embryos are very sensitive to radiation)

The NRC is requesting COMMENTS from the public on this until September 8th.
Can you please raise public awareness about this?

This really needs a strong vocal response against it and LOTS OF COMMENTS.
Here is the link to submit comments, and it also explains it further —>
https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/06/23/2015-15441/linear-no-threshold-model-and-standards-for-protection-against-radiation

And here is a link for those who want to submit their comment ANONYMOUSLY —>
http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=NRC-2015-0057-0010

There is also a good interview by LibbeHaLevy of Nuclear Hotseat who says:

QUOTE:
“Diane D’Arrigo of Nuclear Information and Resource Service (NIRS) on the current Petition in front of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to change radiation evaluation standards from current linear no-threshold to the false science of hormesis (no – whore-YOU-sis) which tries to fool people into believing that “radiation is GOOD for you!”

Comments are needed before September 8 on the NRC website. HERE’S HOW YOU DO IT:

•Go to: Rulemaking.Comments@nrc.gov
•In the subject line, make certain to include the ID number:
NRC-2015-0057-0010
•OR – Go directly to: http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=NRC-2015-0057-0010
•CLICK on the “Comment Now” button.
Then give the NRC a piece of your mind. You don’t have to make it fancy; they count number of responses more than the content. MAKE YOUR VOICES HEARD NOW!”
END QUOTE

http://www.nuclearhotseat.com/2685/

I hope you will choose to not remain silent on this vital matter, and encourage everyone you know to say NO MORE RADIATION EXPOSURE!

Thank you.

ANYONE CAN COMMENT.

more on hormesis by Dr Ian Fairlie here:

Click to access US-NRC-Consultation-pdf.pdf

http://www.ianfairlie.org

Dr Ian Fairlie re the US NRC Consultation: LNT vs Hormesis

US NRC Consultation: LNT vs hormesis

On June 26 2015, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) stated it was seeking public comments by September 8, on petitions stating that the Linear No Threshold theory of radiation’s effects was not a valid basis for setting radiation standards and that the hormesis model should be used instead.

Several US readers have written asking for help in drawing up their own comments. As this is an important issue, I attach my thoughts on the matter. US NRC Consultation pdf

Readers may use this as they wish as long as proper attribution is given.

http://www.ianfairlie.org/news/us-nrc-consultation-lnt-vs-hormesis/

3rd Anniversary of 3.11 vigil/protest in front of the Japanese Embassy, London

Dear anti-nuclear power activists, supporters and friends,

It is the 3rd anniversary of our 3.11 leafleting vigil and protest on 7th August 2015. As it is a special occasion for all of us, we would like to organise our monthly READ-OUT of our
statement to the Japanese Prime Minister on this day instead of 31st July 2015.
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In August in Japan it is reported that Kyushu Electric Power Company plans to apply to regulators for the final ‘applied safety inspection’ of Sendai nuclear power plant 1 on 3rd August. This check is expected to take one week, making 10th August a potential start-up date.
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Another 20 reactors are behind Sendai in the restart process, which is expected to gradually speed up after the first few units are back in normal operation. The Japanese government envisages a return to using nuclear power for 20-22 % of electricity by 2030 as part of a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 26% compared to fiscal year 2013.
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Under such circumstances, it is very important that we keep up raising our voices to show our opposition to Nuclear Power in Japan.
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Himawari JAN UK, Kick Nuclear and CND are planning to organise the monthly READ-OUT of the protest statement to the Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and send the protest statement to the President of TEPCO on Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disasters since 11 March 2011.
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We will start our protest vigil from 10:00am and the statement read-out from 11:30 am on 7th August 2015 ( Friday ) in front of the Japanese Embassy.
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Anti-Nuclear Power speeches/songs/poems are also very welcome.
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The READ-OUT to TEPCO does not take place from this month as their office at Berkley House is moved to the unknown location last week. However, our protest statement will be sent to the TEPCO Head Office in Tokyo, Japan.
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Venue: In front of the Japanese Embassy.
Nearest station: Green Park ( Piccadilly Line, Zone 1 ), 3 minutes walk towards Hyde Park.
Date and Time : 7th August 2015 ( Friday ) from 10:00 am till 12:30 pm.
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8月10日に日本では川内原発の再稼動が予想されています。これに続いて、20基の原発が再稼動に入ると云われています。
このような状況下で日本における原発反対の運動を更に強力に支持するために
8月7日、金曜日、午前10時より、ヒマワリJAN-UK/KickNuclear/CNDはロンドン大使館前にて、脱原発のビラ撒き、
11時半より安倍首相宛てに脱原発の声明文を読み上げ大使館に手渡します。
脱原発のスピーチ、平和の歌、反戦・反核と詩の朗読だども大歓迎です。ご都合のつく方は是非ご参加下さい。
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東電ロンドン・オフィスは6月にBerkley Houseから移転しました。移転先は現在分かっていません。従って、東電宛の
抗議声明文は郵送にて東京本社に送付されます。
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場所:ロンドン日本大使館前、101-104Piccaddilly W11 7LT
最寄駅:Green Park, Piccadelly Line, 駅からHyde Park方向へ徒歩5分。
日時: 8月7日(金)午前10時より午後12時半まで。

HIROSHIMA DAY 70TH ANNIVERSARY CEREMONY, 6th August 2015

HIROSHIMA DAY 70TH ANNIVERSARY CEREMONY          

August 6th 2015, noon-1pm

By the Commemorative Cherry Tree in Tavistock Square, London WC1

This ceremony is held annually by the cherry tree planted in the Square in 1967 by the then Mayor of Camden, Cllr. Millie Miller, in memory of the victims, past and present, of the atomic bombs dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on 6th and 9th August 1945.

Event organised by London Region CND, 162 Holloway Road. London N7 8DQ; david.lrcnd@cndul.org; 020-7607 2302.

Programme: order of participants

  • Bruce Kent, CND Vice-Presidentcompère
  • Peace Choir: The Hiroshima Song
  • Cllr. Larraine Revah, Mayor of Camden
  • George Binette, Chair of Camden Trades’ Council
  • Peter Dunn and Paul Steele (singers)
  • Jeremy Corbyn, MP
  • AL Kennedy: poetry
  • Sheila Triggs, Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom: foundation in 1915 and today
  • Rev. S. Nagase, Monk at Battersea Peace Pagoda
  • Potent Whisper: “Trident on Trial” rap
  • Baroness Jenny Jones, Green Party and member of Greater London Authority.
  • Peace Choir: Against the Atom Bomb
  • Two minute’s silence, during which you are invited to lay flowers at the base of the commemorative cherry tree in memory of the victims of Hiroshima, Nagasaki and all victims of war
  • Everybody: The H-Bomb’s Thunder
……………………………………………………………………………….
You are invited to picnic in the Square after the ceremony.  Light refreshments available, courtesy of Belle Harris: donations requested.  (Any surplus after costs to be donated to LRCND.)

The Fukushima Radionuclides Polluting the Pacific, Causing Extinction Events

nuclear-news

R&D on Treatment and Disposal of Radioactive Waste resulting from Accident at Fukushima Daiichi NPS​

Here are isotopes of interest from the Fukushima Daiichi man made nuclear disaster.

This is what has polluted the Pacific, caused extinction events and will continue to, and the industry has nothing but profit for it all.

The following radionuclides are selected referring to the radionuclides for evaluation in the existing disposal system

γ-ray nuclide : 60Co, 94Nb, 137Cs, 152Eu, 154Eu

β-ray nuclide : 3H, 14C, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 63Ni, 79Se, 90Sr, 99Tc, 129I, 241Pu

α-ray nuclide : 233, 234, 235, 236, 238U, 237Np, 238,239,240,242Pu, 241,242m,243Am, 244,245,246Cm
Sources:

http://irid.or.jp/_pdf/20150421_2.pdf

http://irid.or.jp/en/reports/

 Special thanks to Richard Wood

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Nagasaki Day peace walk and commemoration at the London Peace Pagoda, Battersea Park

NAGASAKI DAY AUGUST 9th
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On 9th August, from 6.30-7.30 pm, an ecumenical service organised by Pax Christi (020 8203 4884) will take place at Sacred Heart Chapel, situated on Horseferry Road, SW1P 2EF, in memory of the 72nd anniversary of Blessed Franz Jagerstatter’s execution in 1943 for refusing to serve in Hitler’s army. Franz Jagerstatter was beatified in October 2007. Following the servicethere will be an interfaith Peace Walk to the London Peace Pagoda in Battersea Park for a Floating Lantern Ceremony. This will begin at dusk to commemorate the 70th Anniversary for victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and all wars. 
The ceremony seeks to reflect on the horrors of war in an atomic age and to pray together for peace and harmony between all people and nations.
All are very welcome to join and offer flowers and incense.
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Contact Nipponzan Myohoji: Tel: 020 7228 9620
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https://londonpeacepagoda.wordpress.com/2015/07/17/nagasaki-day-9th-august/

Senator John F. Kennedy re atmospheric nuclear tests, April 2, 1960

REMARKS OF SENATOR JOHN F. KENNEDY AT WISCONSIN ASSOCIATION OF STUDENT COUNCILS, MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN, APRIL 2, 1960

We have been talking about change and challenge, about leadership and vision. No change in the world about us presents a greater challenge – no problem calls for greater leadership and vision – than the radioactive pollution of our atmosphere by the testing of nuclear weapons.

It is not a simple problem with simple answers. The experts disagree – the evidence is in conflict – the obstacles to an international solution are large and many. But the issue of nuclear tests and their effects is one which should be discussed in the coming months – not as a purely partisan matter, but as one of the great issues on the American scene.

I was glad, therefore, that this issue was raised last Sunday in a constructive and thoughtful way by the Governor of New York. His statement contributed to the dialogue on this basic issue – it represented the position of a leading figure in the Republican Party – and it neither hedged nor equivocated. So I commend Governor Rockefeller for his comments, and hope they will be considered and debated by interested citizens everywhere.

But I must also express my own emphatic disagreement with his statement, which called for this country to resume nuclear test explosions. Such a proposal, it seems to me, is unwise when it is suggested just prior to the reopening of negotiations with the British and Russians at Geneva on this very question. It is damaging to the American image abroad at a time when the Russians have unilaterally suspended their testing. And, while Mr. Rockefeller did suggest that the testing take place underground to prevent fall-out, he discounted the harmful effects of fall-out – which I am unwilling to do.

It is true that the amount of radiation created by bomb tests so far offers no serious threat to the well-being or existence of mankind as a whole. But it is also true that there is no amount of radiation so small that it has no ill effects at all on anybody. There is actually no such thing as a minimum permissible dose. Perhaps we are talking about only a very small number of individual tragedies – the number of atomic age children with cancer, the new victims of leukemia, the damage to skin tissues here and reproductive systems there – perhaps these are too small to measure with statistics. But they nevertheless loom very large indeed in human and moral terms.

Radiation, in its simplest terms – figuratively, literally and chemically – is poison. Nuclear explosions in the atmosphere are slowly but progressively poisoning our air, our earth, our water and our food. And it falls, let us remember, on both sides of the Iron Curtain, on all peoples of all lands, regardless of their political ideology, their way of life, their religion or the color of their skin. Beneath this bombardment of radiation which man has created, all men are indeed equal.

Perhaps the ill effects and the dangers of fall-out from bomb tests can be regarded today, in statistical terms, as minimal. But let us remember that there is still much that we do not know – and that too often in the past we have minimized the perils and shrugged aside these dangers, only to find that our estimates were faulty and that new knowledge inevitably increased our appreciation of these dangers. Let us remember also that our resumption of tests would bring Russian resumption of tests – it would make negotiations even more strained- it would spur other nations seeking entry into the “atomic club”, with their own tests polluting the atmosphere – and, in short, it could precede the kind of long, feverish testing period which all scientists agree would threaten the very existence of man himself.

The arguments advanced in favor of a test resumption are not unreasonable. The emphasis is on the weapons development – the necessity to move ahead “in the advanced techniques of the use of nuclear material.” This reason is not to be dismissed lightly. Because this country cannot hope to match the Soviets in raw numbers of ground forces, we rely on technical military superiority. We need to develop small nuclear weapons and so-called “clean” nuclear weapons, in order to deter their use or other forms of limited aggression by the enemy. This is not, I might add, justification for cutting back our ground forces and our ability to wage conventional warfare – but it is nevertheless important.

But let us remember that our present test suspension – while unilateral – is implicitly conditional on a Russian test suspension. If we are not developing new weapons in the absence of tests, neither are they. If we will make progress militarily through the resumption of tests, so, in all probability, will they. And the facts of the matter are that, generally speaking, we are ahead of the Russians in the development of atomic warheads but behind in the development of delivery systems. Until this lag can be overcome, there is a lesser value for us in testing and developing further “techniques in the use of nuclear material.” In short, for both sides to resume atomic tests today might well turn out to be more of a disadvantage to the west militarily than a help.

I would suggest, therefore, the following alternative position:

1. First, that the United States announce that it will continue its unilateral suspension of nuclear tests as long as the Russians continue theirs, and as long as serious negotiations for a permanent ban with enforceable inspection are proceeding in good faith. Our present extension of the ban expires on December 31st.

2. Secondly, the United States must redouble its efforts to achieve a comprehensive and effective test suspension agreement – and develop a single, clear-cut, well defined and realistic policy for an inspection system and for the other conditions such an agreement must meet. We do not have such a policy today.

3. Third, should it be necessary for our tests to resume, they should be confined to underground and outer-space explosions, and testing of only certain small weapons in the upper atmosphere in order to prevent a further increase in the fall-out menace – and in the hope, moreover, that the Russians and others will be forced by world opinion to follow our example.

4. Fourth and finally, we must step up our studies of the impact of radioactive fall-out and how to control it, through the Public Health Service here at home and a special United Nations monitoring commission abroad. Let us not discover the precise point of danger after we have passed it. Let us not again reject these warnings of peril as “catastrophic nonsense” (to quote Mr. Nixon), as they were rejected in 1956 when put forward by a great Democratic standard-bearer, Adlai E. Stevenson.

These four policy positions are no magic solution – nor can they be achieved overnight without effort. But the new and terrible dangers which man has created can only be controlled by man. And if we can master this danger and meet this challenge, we will have earned the deep and lasting gratitude, not only of all men, but of all yet to be born – even to the farthest generation.